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UW Oshkosh Political Science Courses


Current Semester Syllabi

This is a list of courses and syllabi for the 14-week Spring 2017 and below Fall 2016 courses. Interim course syllabi will be posted at a later date.

Courses and Syllabi
Fall 2017 Syllabi (available by Fall semester – Spring 2017 below)

Political Science 101-001 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Political Science 101-001 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Political Science 105-001 American Government and Politics

Political Science 105-002 American Government and Politics

Political Science 105-003 American Government and Politics

Political Science 105-301 American Government and Politics

Political Science 108 Essentials of Civic Engagement

Political Science 111 Politics and Culture-Global Perspective

Political Science 112 Power, Justice, and the State

Political Science 115 International Politics

Political Science 116 Environmental Politics & Sustainability

Political Science 245 Political Methodology

Political Science 253 Introduction to Law

Political Science 301 European Union Politics

Political Science 310 Urban Politics

Political Science 328 Terrorism & Counter-Terrorism

Political Science 342 Gender, Law and Policy

Political Science 346 Queer Politics and Policy

Political Science 357 Environmental Policy

Political Science 373 African Politics

Political Science 376 International Conflict

Political Science 378 Modern American Political Thought


Spring 2017 Syllabi

Political Science 101-001 Introduction to Comparative Politics 101 Slagter

Political Science 101-002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 101 Scribner

Political Science 105-001 American Government and Politics 105 Krueger

Political Science 105-002 American Government and Politics 105 Simmons

Political Science 105-003 American Government and Politics 105 Kalmbach

Political Science 105-004 American Government and Politics 105 Krueger

Political Science 115-001 International Politics 115 Jasinski

Political Science 214 Politics of Food 214 Slagter

Political Science 245 Political Methodology 245 Krueger

Political Science 253 Introduction to Law 253 Thomas

Political Science 313 Politics of Genocide 313 Slagter

Political Science 316 Environmental Law 316 Thomas Interim

Political Science 322 International Political Economy 322 Jasinski

Political Science 336 Russian Politics 336 Jasinski

Political Science 355 Modern Political Thought 355 Simmons

Political Science 357 Environmental Policy 357 Kalmbach

Political Science 392 Judicial Process in America 392 Thomas

Political Science 401 Political Analysis 401 Simmons

 

Course Catalog

Here you will be provided with a descriptive summary of our courses.

Courses

Political Science 101  Introduction to Comparative Politics  (SS) (NW) (XS) (GC) This course provides an introduction to key concepts and issues in comparative politics in the context of case studies from Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa and the Middle East. It explores political participation and institutions, political ideology and culture, the role of government, political parties, democratization, economic development and inequality, nationalism, and ethnic and religious conflict in variety of national and regional contexts around the globe.  3 credits

Political Science 105  American Government and Politics (SS) (XS)  Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches. 3 credits

Political Science 106  Honors: American Government and Politics (SS) (XS)  Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title. 3 credits

Political Science 107  Honors: Introduction to Comparative Politics  (SS) (NW) (XS) (GC) This course provides an introduction to key concepts and issues in comparative politics in the context of case studies from Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa and the Middle East. It explores political participation and institutions, political ideology and culture, the role of government, political parties, democratization, economic development and inequality, nationalism, and ethnic and religious conflict in variety of national and regional contexts around the globe. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors program with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175. 3 credits

Political Science 108  Essentials of Civic Engagement (SS)(XS)  Introduces the student to the obligations and benefits of active citizenship and participation in their communities. Theories of citizenship and citizen activity, policy analysis, the state of public policies at the full array of governing levels from local to global, and experiential activities within the community are featured. This is the gateway course to both the Civic Engagement Minor and the Civic Engagement emphasis within the Political Science Major. 3 credits

Political Science 111 Politics and Culture- Global Perspective (SS)(XS)(GC)  This Quest 1, Global Citizenship course focuses on a current global issue or set of issues. Students will gain an ability to analyze, understand, evaluate, and appreciate the complex dynamics that shape our collective capacity to address global challenges in a complex and interconnected world. The course provides an introduction to governance in societies with different cultural perspectives and examines different vantage points of political actors tasked with governing (global, transnational, national, and local) in societies outside the United States. 3 credits

Political Science 112  Power, Justice, and the State (SS)(XS)  Power, Justice, and the State invites you to consider critical themes of public interest. Why do we have a state? What should the state do and why? What should it not do and why should it not? Sate power may obviously be used for ill, but when and how can it be used for good? Does citizenship create obligations about how to treat others as well as benefits citizens? We will consider several major schools of thought about this, which we label theories of justice. We will discuss the strengths and shortcomings of these theories in practice, looking in depth at various arenas of state involvement. 3 credits

Political Science 113  The Democratic Arena (SS)(XS)  Strong democracy requires citizens who are informed, knowledgeable, and actively engaged in the political process. This course will provide students with the orientation they need to make sense of the complex social questions that make up the nation’s public agenda. First, we will explore the rules of the political game. We will then examine the popular debates over major social problems. Lastly, we will devote considerable attention to those contested topics that challenge students to understand, care about, and become involved in national and local policy debates. 3 credits

Political Science 114  The Politics of Race and Sex (XS)(SS)(ES)  The Politics of Race and Sex invites students to explore similarities and differences in the values, history, and influence of U.S. cultural groups through the lens of representation in government. What does it mean for a group to receive representation? What forms can representation take? How does representation (or a lack of representation) impact the identities and meanings a group applies to itself, and its relationships with other groups? We will examine these questions by investigating current theories of representation, with a critical eye toward the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Moreover, we will apply these theories to the real world through attending events hosted by cultural groups present at UWO and throughout the Fox Valley. 3 credits

Political Science 115  International Politics (SS) (XS) (GC)  Development of the nation-state system; role of the great powers; the struggle for power; settlement of disputes; diplomacy, the quest for law, nationalism, contemporary problems. 3 credits

Political Science 116  Environmental Politics and Sustainability (XS)(SS)  This course examines the political forces and challenges to developing and adopting sustainable environmental policies in the United States. This course provides an overview of the U.S. political system, sustainability as a lens of inquiry, and the policy making process. What values do we want to sustain? Do environmental policies support these values? Specific policy areas examined include air, water, land, energy, waste, plant, and animal life. 3 credits

Political Science 212  Study Abroad: Optional Content  Study Abroad is a course offered by our faculty with most of the content delivered off campus, usually but not always outside of the United States. These courses introduce places and subjects through reading and lecture but heavily emphasize experiential learning in the location of study. Courses offered under this title may include such offerings as: British Politics, German Politics, Comparative Genocide, Comparative West European Politics, and US Supreme Court. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 2-6 credits

Political Science 214  Politics of Food (SS)(XS)  In this course, we’ll learn about how food policy is made at the national, state, and local levels. Then we’ll examine how those policies impact the type and quantities of the food we eat, food distribution, food safety, and nutrition. Throughout, we’ll have an eye to the future: is our current food system sustainable: That is, will it last beyond our lifetimes? Our class will encounter these issues not only in the classroom, but through our work with partners in the Oshkosh community. 3 credits

Political Science 245  Political Methodology (SS)  Designed to acquaint students with the process of exploring political questions and conducting research. Topics include theory definition, hypothesis development, concept definition and data collection and analysis. This course will also expose students to a variety of data sources and methods of collection such as survey research, content analysis and experimentation. 3 credits

Political Science 253  Introduction to Law (SS)  The development of political systems of jurisprudence, the judicial system of the United States and Wisconsin together with a survey of the major branches of law designating the place of law in society. 3 credits

Political Science 261  Environment and Society (SS)(XS)  Examines relationship between social structure, culture and natural environments; compares different modes of production and cultural systems. Examines economic, political and ideological structures of industrial and industrializing societies. Analyzes the impact of these structures upon natural environments and analyzes the impact of natural environment upon these structures. Sociology 261/Environmental Studies 261/Political Science 261 Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Special course fees may apply. 3 credits

Political Science 301  European Union Politics  Examines the history and theories of European integration and provides a detailed introduction to each of the institutions of the European Union. Some of the major issues that the EU has worked through in its short history (e.g., agricultural policy, economic and monetary union, constitution, enlargement) as well as current challenges facing the organization are also covered. Prerequisites: Political Science 101 or 115 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 302  Civil Liberties in the United States (SS)(XS)  Philosophy of civil liberties; constitutional basis, rights of conscience and expression; rights of persons accused of crime; political rights; equal protection of the laws. Cross-listed: Political Science 302/Women’s and Gender Studies 302. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Political Science 105. 3 credits

Political Science 303  Women, Politics and Policy: A Global Perspective (SS) (GS) This is a comparative politics course that examines how women’s political power varies across countries and around the globe. The course examines topics such as: women’s representation in government and political explanations for the variation across countries; women’s movements locally and globally and the degree to which they have been able to achieve their objectives; and gender policy that affects women’s political and economic empowerment around the globe, including violence against women policy, family law, social policy, and reproductive health policy. The course is designated as a “Global Scholar” course. Cross-listed: Political Science 303/ Women’s and Gender Studies 303/Social Justice 303. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Political Science 101 or 105 is recommended, but not required. 3 credits

Political Science 304  Race and Ethnicity in United States Politics (ES) (SS)  How issues of race and ethnicity have been defined and by whom, and their impact on communities of color; the strategies used by minority groups to become equal participants in the political system; how economic and social conditions might affect political opportunities for minority groups. This course will examine these topics in a historical perspective, with an eye to the interplay between national, state, and local political outcomes. Cross-listed: Political Science 304/Social Justice 304. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 305  Constitutional Law and Judicial Policy-Making I (SS)  The American Constitution as seen in the jurisprudence of the Supreme Court; judicial review; federalism; the contract clause; taxing and spending power; interstate commerce. 3 credits

Political Science 306  Constitutional Law and Judicial Policy-Making II (SS)  Constitutional law of the Bill of Rights and Fourteenth Amendment as applied to the federal government and the states. Includes law of freedom of speech, press and assembly; freedom of religion; due process; rights of the accused in criminal proceedings (search and seizure, right to counsel, etc.); and discriminatory governmental classifications (race, gender, etc.). 3 credits

Public Administration 307  Administrative Law and Procedure (SS)  The rule-making and adjudicating powers of governmental agencies. Specific topics such as rights of public employees in dismissal or suspension proceedings, rights of industries in regulatory proceedings, and open meeting laws. Judicial review of agency action. Prerequisite: Public Affairs 221 or Criminal Justice 212 or consent of instructor.  3 credits

Political Science 308  International Law  This course introduces students to the key components of the international legal system and its primary institutions. Does international law matter? Does it constrain state behavior? When does it apply? Can it be enforced? Students will answer these questions as they not only read about principles of international law but put those principles to use wrestling with problems based on actual cases. Prerequisites: Political Science 101 or 115 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 309  West European Politics (SS) (GS)  This course examines the large issues facing European countries today and how they impact not only Europe, but the entire world. Examples include the refugee crisis, the rise of the far-right, independence movements, and European Union membership, in addition to others that may arise in this rapidly changing environment. We’ll use the U.K., France and Germany as core case studies, adding Sweden, Italy, or Belgium as necessary to illustrate important concepts. 3 credits

Political Science 310  Urban Government (SS)  Focus on urban politics and policy making. Topics to be examined include: The impact of local institutional arrangements upon electoral and policy outcomes; the impact of federal policies and a changing world economy upon economies and land use patterns; and how increased racial diversity has altered urban political dynamics. 3 credits

Political Science 311  East Asian Politics (NW) (SS) (GS)  This course is an introduction to the politics of Southeast Asia. We will examine regional and global forces including colonialism, nationalism, and religious and ethnic conflict and evaluate their influence on Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Our broader goal throughout this process is to understand the impact that these forces and political and economic events have had both across and within Southeast Asian societies. Along the way we will gain both a historical and theoretical background for understanding the complexity of modern Southeast Asian politics, particularly as they relate to the structure of government, political and economic privilege, and persistent communal crises such as: environmental degradation, sex trafficking, and genocide. The final section of our course will evaluate the success of organizations and initiatives spanning the local to the transnational in addressing social, political, and economic crises. This course qualifies for the global scholar designation.  3 credits

Political Science 312  Experiential Study: Optional Content  Experiential Study is a course offered by our faculty off campus, usually but not always outside of the United States. These courses introduce places and subjects through reading and lecture but heavily emphasize experiential learning in place of study. Courses offered under this title include British Politics, German Politics, Comparative Genocide, Comparative West European Politics, and US Supreme Court. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 2-6 credits

Political Science 313  Politics of Genocide  In this course, we examine the sad phenomenon of genocide from two distinct perspectives in our discipline: comparative politics and international relations. In the beginning of the course, we look inside the state to get an idea of the social, economic and political situations that make a state more susceptible to genocide and see if there are indicators common to most genocides. The second part of the course examines several genocides in detail. In the final section of the course, we attempt to figure out why preventing and punishing genocide and other crimes against humanity is so difficult, and evaluate the methods used for prosecution and punishment to date. Cross-listed: Political Science 313/Social Justice 313. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Political Science 101 or 115 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 315  Policy Analysis (SS)  This course introduces techniques for analyzing policies and evaluating the consequences of governmental decisions. Consideration is given to the factors that affect policy success, including problem definition, implementation challenges, and enforcement issues. Prospects for reforming existing policies are also discussed in depth. 3 credits

Political Science 316  Environmental Law  This course focuses on U.S. (federal) environmental law, with particular focus on common law and administrative law. The course examines legal frameworks for environmental law in the federal court system, including how federal courts review the policies of administrative agencies that regulate the environment. The course also probes philosophical and social underpinnings of environmental law, such as ecofeminism, capitalism, collectivism, and cost-benefit analyses. One of the main course themes is examining environmental law and policy through a sustainability lens. Students are strongly recommended to have prior coursework or an equivalent understanding of basic principles of American Government (Poli Sci 105) and Environmental Studies (either Environmental Studies 101 or Poli Sci/Env Stds 261). Cross-listed: Political Science 316/ Environmental Studies 316. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 317  United States Foreign Policy (SS)  Formulation, implementation and objectives of United States foreign policy; role of president, bureaucracy, Congress, public opinion, and other forces.  Prerequisite: Political Science 101 or 115 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 321  American Public Policy (SS)  An examination of some of the major political issues facing American society today, including the environment, criminal justice issues, equality, education and health care politics. The issue of how public policy is made in this country will also be examined in some detail. 3 credits

Political Science 322  International Political Economy (SS) (GS)  This course examines the evolution of ideas on the nature of international and comparative economics during the last two centuries, performs comparative analysis of political effects of economic policies in selected countries, including United States, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Russia, and others, examines the problems faced by developing countries in a globalizing world, and examines measures undertaken to create a stable global economic environment during the last two centuries. 3 credits

Political Science 323  Comparative Constitutional Law  This course analyzes the origins and role of constitutions and constitutional law in contemporary comparative politics. The course examines the theory and practice of comparative constitutional law in developing and developed countries. In particular, the course focuses on the accommodation of cultural differences (ethnic, linguistic, religious) in law and the adjudication of various kinds of rights claims by constitutional courts. Students examine relevant legal theory and case law across countries and consider the political significance of courts with constitutional review powers. Political Science 101 or 115 are recommended. 3 credits

Political Science 324  US Presidency (SS)  Conceptions of the office; evolution of the executive branch; the president’s power and limitation; proposed reforms. Political Science 105 is recommended. 3 credits

Political Science 328  Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (GS)  The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the phenomenon of terrorism, including theories of terrorism, political violence, and terrorism as a social movement. In addition to providing the historical context, the course focuses on recent and contemporary terrorist groups operating in Europe and the Middle East and on international terrorist groups, and examines approaches used by United States, European Union countries, Russia, and Israel, to cope with their respective terrorism challenges. 3 credits

Political Science 329 Political Psychology  This course will focus on politically relevant aspects of human psychology and behavior, both individual and group. Topics discussed will include individual needs and preferences, the concept of rationality and alternative views on the conception of self-interest, factors affecting perception of the surrounding political environment, and how these phenomena translate into individual and group political activity. 3 credits

Political Science 330  Discrimination and Legal Remedies (SS)(XS)  Examination of issues of discrimination in American society against groups and individuals and how the system responds to these problems. Issues of race, ethnicity, gender, economic class, sexual orientation, and physical disability are among those examined. Cross-listed: Political Science 330/Women’s and Gender Studies 330. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 335  State and Local Government (SS)  Examination of the institutions and policy-making of state political systems, with special emphasis given to Wisconsin. Topics to be examined include: the changing nature of federal-state relationship; electoral rules and their political parties, candidates, and outcomes; how the executive, legislative and judicial branches are structured and how they jointly create policy in selected areas. 3 credits

Political Science 336  Russian Politics (NW) (SS)  Even though Russia and the United States share many similarities, including large territorial size, wealth of natural resources, highly diverse population, and major power status, Russia’s political system has developed along very different lines from that of the United States. The course examines the factors influencing the development of the Russian political system, occasionally delving into the reasons for the US-Russian political divergence, including the causes and effects of Russia’s two regime changes during the 20th century. While predominantly a study of domestic policies, the course also evaluates the influence of the international environment of Russia’s political system during different periods of its existence, and discusses the impact of Russia’s political influence on its neighboring states. 3 credits

Political Science 339  Political Economy of Asia (SS)  Examination of the politics of growth in East Asia. Countries to be covered will include Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, and other countries to be selected by the instructor. The course will cover the politics of economic policy making in these countries to be selected by the policy in the process in industrialization and trade. Finally, the course will examine the impact of development on the political regimes of these countries, especially in the link between economic change and democracy. Prerequisite: Political Science 101 or Political Science 115. 3 credits

Political Science 342  Gender, Law and Policy  This course examines the most significant legal and policy issues relating to gender (the roles, behaviors, activities, and attributes considered appropriate for men and women). The legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues: work, family, education, pay equity, reproductive rights, military service, violence, and social justice. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in a critical analysis of the relationship between law and gender that is grounded in court decisions and legal commentary, and centered on competing theoretical frameworks of gender equality in a democratic society. The course utilizes a comparative approach and draws on case law from the United States, South Africa, regional human rights courts, and UN bodies that interpret international law. The course does not assume prior background in political science, law, or women’s studies; however, previous coursework in any of these areas will be helpful. Cross-listed: Political Science 342/ Women’s and Gender Studies 342. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 346  Queer Politics and Policy  What role does sexual identity play in American politics? In what ways has domestic politics shaped the U.S. LGBT community? In this course, we will debate the meaning of sexual identity and ideologies and explore how they have been viewed throughout American history. Next we will examine the impact of sexual identity on public opinion and political participants, particularly candidates and officeholders. We will look at the unique experiences of LGBT groups in the U.S., and consider the relationships between sexual identity, race, class, and gender. Finally, we will look at the relationship between sexual identity and public policy, particularly: same-sex marriage, adoption rights, anti-sodomy laws, and hate crimes legislation. 3 credits

Political Science 349  Foundations of Political Theory (SS)  Classical period through Hobbes. Environmental influences on political philosophers; psychological factors; clarification of concepts. 3 credits

Political Science 350  Elections and Political Behavior (SS)  Examines national and statewide political campaigns and elections. This includes analysis of the U.S. publics’ political participation, mass opinion, and understanding of democratic citizenship. 3 credits

Political Science 351  Political Film (SS)  Examines, through the study of film, topics in political leadership, party politics, justice, social problems, political theory, comparative government, and international relations. 3 credits

Political Science 352  Politics of National Security  The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the issues and controversies surrounding US national security policy, with particular emphasis on the US military as a tool of US foreign policy. 3 credits

Political Science 354  Science, Politics and Policy  An examination of how science and technology affect public policy. Consideration is given to the role of science and scientists in policy formulation and implementation, and how political actors utilize scientific information in policy debates. Discussion topics will include the role of science and technology in governmental decisions about energy, health, space exploration, the environment, and national defense. 3 credits

Political Science 355  Modern Political Thought (SS)  This course examines the theory of how politics works and how it should work by reading and considering major political thinkers from the Renaissance forward to modernity. These thinkers make claims about humans and societies that cross time and context. Thus we consider how their arguments have been employed and their continued relevance given today’s issues and challenges. A number of theorists we meet are among the most influential writers in human history and we assess how our thinking has been affected by them. Alternative visions of the way things should be and explanations of how society works are considered as well. Cross-listed: Political Science 355/Social Justice 355. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 357  Environmental Policy  This course examines the process in which environmental policy is made. the course will introduce students to interdisciplinary approaches used to analyze environmental problems. The role of political actors, scientific experts and the citizenry in identifying problems and developing solutions is considered. Emphasis is also placed on the use of scientific information and values in the decision-making process. Topics to be covered include major US and international legislation protecting air and water quality, climate change, natural resource extraction, agricultural production, and land management. Prerequisite: Political Science 105 or Environmental Studies 261 or consent of instructor. Cross-listed: Political Science 357/ Environmental Studies 357. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 365  Congress in the American Political System (SS)  Examination of the organization, membership, and powers of the U.S. Congress.  It will focus on Congress as both a legislative and representative institution, and will examine the relationship between Congress, the President, and the courts. Prerequisite: Political Science 105 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 366  The Politics of Urban Growth (SS)  Examination of the issues of growth and development, which are of paramount concern to cities of all sizes. It explores the question of why cities view growth and development as a top priority, the institutions and actors who play important roles in the developmental policy arena, developmental strategies, and the broad political, economic, and environmental contexts of growth and development. 3 credits

Political Science 370  Special Topics – Group I (SS)  Experimental courses and curriculum innovations within the department. Descriptive titles, abbreviated course descriptions, and number of units (crs.) will be announced in the class schedule prior to the beginning of the semester during which the course is to be offered. Prerequisite: To be stated when title is announced. May be repeated in different terms. 3 credits

Political Science 372  Special Topics – Group II (SS)  Experimental courses and curriculum innovations within the department. Descriptive titles, abbreviated course descriptions, and number of units (crs.) will be announced in the class schedule prior to the beginning of the term during which the course is to be offered. Prerequisite: To be stated when title is announced. May be repeated in different terms. 3 credits

Political Science 373  Special Topics – Group III (SS)  Experimental courses and curriculum innovations within the department. Descriptive titles, abbreviated course descriptions, and number of units (crs.) will be announced in the class schedule prior to the beginning of the term during which the course is to be offered. Prerequisite: To be stated when title is announced. May be repeated in different terms. 3 credits

Political Science 374  Special Topics – Group IV (SS)  Experimental courses and curriculum innovations within the department. Descriptive titles, abbreviated course descriptions, and number of units (crs.) will be announced in the class schedule prior to the beginning of the term during which the course is to be offered. Prerequisite: To be stated when title is announced. May be repeated in different terms. 3 credits

Political Science 375  Special Topics – Group V (SS)  Experimental courses and curriculum innovations within the department. Descriptive titles, abbreviated course descriptions, and number of units (crs.) will be announced in the class schedule prior to the beginning of the term during which the course is to be offered. Prerequisite: To be stated when title is announced. May be repeated in different terms. 3 credits

Political Science 376  International Conflict (SS)  A multi-disciplinary approach to study the causes and conditions of war and peace in our world. Simulations of situations of war and peace will be researched in the classroom with student participation. 3 credits

Political Science 377  Foundations of American Political Thought (SS)  This course introduces some of the key themes, thinkers, and decision points in American history from the American founding forward to the New Deal. The ideas of prevalent commentators and political practitioners will be featured. Through them we will attempt to discern the values which have shaped and influenced the United States government and American attitudes. Alternative visions of government and paths not taken will also be considered. Those who complete the course will come to appreciate the great variety of American political thought. Readings and discussion will help us to discern what kind of community we have been and how ideas have shaped the American nation, matters of utmost concern for the politically literate citizen. Cross-listed: Political Science 377/Social Justice 377. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 378  Modern American Political Thought  An exploration of key themes, dilemmas, and decision points in American political history from the New Deal to the present. The ideas of influential thinkers and political practitioners like John Dewey, Milton Friedman, Michael Walzer, Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama are featured, as well as those who present alternative visions of the American political landscape. Cross-listed: Political Science 378/Social Justice 378. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. 3 credits

Political Science 379  Latin American Politics (NW) (SS) (GS)  This course is an analysis of the governmental institutions, political process and political cultures of Latin America and explores issues of democracy and development in Latin America. We focus on the nature and limitations of democracy in the region, as well as long-standing regional and global issues that affect democratic political development: market-oriented economic reforms, social inequality, climate change, political violence, corruption, and drug trafficking.   Political Science 101 recommended. 3 credits

Political Science 380  Political Parties and Interest Groups (SS)  Party organization, nominations, campaigning, election behavior. Interest group organization, pressures on electoral and governmental process. Prerequisite: Political Science 105 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 383  Latin America in International Relations (SS) (GS)  This course explores the dynamics of Latin American international relations and forms of cooperation from both historical and contemporary perspectives. The course focuses on important cross-border and global issues affecting the Americas.  Political Science 101 or 115 are recommended. 3 credits

Political Science 386  Politics of Development (SS) (GS) This course explores the concept of ‘development’ and critically examines experiences of economic and political development in the developing world in order to understand the political roots of diverse government policies to confront major development issues such as poverty, injustice, corruption, democratization, environmental degradation, and deadly conflict. Cross-listed: Political Science 386/Social Justice 386/Environmental Studies 386. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses. Poli Sci 101 or 115 are recommended. 3 credits

Political Science 388  Global Environmental Politics (SS)  Examination of the role of environmental issues in international relations. We will look at such issues as global warming, global pollution, management of scarce resources, and eco-development. How have various countries responded to these problems? How should they respond? What is the role of international institutions such as the World Bank? What is the role of non-governmental organizations such as Greenpeace? How have countries and international institutions interacted to deal with these environmental problems? Cross-listed with Political Science 388/Environmental Studies 388 Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses. Prerequisite: Political Science 101 or 115 or Sociology 261 or Environmental Studies 261 or Political Science 261 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 390  Feminist Theory: Optional Content (SS)  Explores the distinct but intersecting explanations for women’s personal, professional, and political conditions, as well as various recommendations for improving or transforming those conditions.  This course may be offered using different content.  When cross-listed with different departments or offered using different subtitles, it may be repeated for credit with consent of director. 3 credits

Political Science 392  Judicial Process in America (SS)  Focuses on courts in the political process. Examines decisions by judges, juries and other decision-makers in the judicial process. Emphasizes explanations for decisions rather than simply describing decisions. For example, attention is given to the effects of race, social class and other demographic characteristics of a defendant on the verdict or sentence imposed. Other related topics include selection of judges and impact of judicial decisions. Prerequisite: Political Science 253 or consent of instructor. 3 credits

Political Science 393  International Organization (SS)  How do international organizations facilitate state cooperation? What are the hallmarks of organizational effectiveness? Do states need international organizations to work out complex problems? These are among the questions undertaken in this course as we explore theories of international organization and then look at several organizations in detail. Prerequisite: Political Science 101 or 115 or instructor consent. 3 credits

Political Science 394  Community Power Systems (SS)  Explores the issue of how political and economic power is distributed and maintained at the local level. It examines competing theories of power relationships, the way in which grassroots communities might organize to change the status quo (in various policy arenas), and the limits to grassroots collective action. These topics are placed in the context of changes in local institutional arrangements, changes in the world economy, and increased ethnic diversity. 3 credits

Political Science 396  Internship in Government (SS)  Internships generally fall into the following categories: 1) administrative internships; 2) legislative internships; 3) judicial or court-related internships; 4) international internships; 5) internships with law firms; 6) law enforcement internships; 7) fieldwork in political campaigns or with political parties; 8) internships with other groups seeking to influence public policy.  Internships are offered for up to 8 units (crs.) and may be applied to the major.  Prerequisite: Generally internships will be open only to juniors or seniors who have had at least one relevant course in Political Science, or demonstrate an equivalent level of knowledge about the political system before the internship. 1-5 credits

Political Science 401  Political Analysis (SS)  Political Analysis is a seminar designed to provide a capstone experience for majors. The course will assess the student’s mastery of the discipline of Political Science. Possible areas of study include the proper methods of political analysis, revision and extension of previous work, advanced analysis of texts, and/or a culminating research project. In addition, students will take a comprehensive departmental exam covering the discipline and prepare a portfolio of their undergraduate work in the discipline. Prerequisite: Political Science 245, senior standing and Political Science major. 3 credits

Political Science 446  Independent Study (SS)  See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. 1-3 credits

Political Science 456  Related Readings (SS)  See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. 1-3 credits

Political Science 474  Honors: Thesis (SS)  Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production.  Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor.  Course title for transcript will be Honors Thesis.  Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty.  Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing.  Maximum of 6 credits. 1-3 credits

Future Course Array

Here you will be provided with a list of courses that are tentatively scheduled for Spring 2018.

Courses

Spring 2018

84-101 Introduction to Comparative – 10:20-11:20 MWF (Quest II) Scribner; 12:40-1:40 MWF Slagter

84-105 American Government and Politics – 9:40-11:10 TR (Quest II) Thomas; 10:20-11:20 MWF  Simmons; 11:30-12:30 MWF (Quest II) Siemers; 3:00-4:30 MW Simmons 

84-107 Honors: Introduction to Comparative – 11:30-12:30 MWF Scribner

84-115 International Politics – 11:30-12:30 MWF Slagter; 3:00-4:30 TR (Quest II) Jasinski

84-214 Politics of Food – 9:10-10:10 MWF  (Quest III) Slagter

84-245 Political Methodology – 9:40-11:10 TR Krueger

84-253 Introduction to Law – 9:10-10:10 MWF Thomas

84-305 Constitutional Law and Judicial Policy – 10:20-11:20 MWF Thomas

84-312 Advocacy Storytelling for Civic Engagement – 3:00-4:30 MW Lim

84-315 Policy Analysis – 11:30-12:30 MWF Kalmbach

84-321 American Public Policy – 9:00-12:00 M-F Interim Kalmbach

84-322 International Political Economy – 11:-30-1:00 TR Jasinski

84-349 Foundations of Political Theory – 3:00-4:30 TR Siemers

84-352 Politics of national Security – 9:40-11:10 TR Jasinski

84-380 Political Parties & Interest Groups – 6:00-9:00 M Simmons

84-386 Politics of Development – 1:20-2:50 TR Scribner

84-401 Political Analysis – 3:00-4:30 MW Siemers